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Viewing all items for tag home decor

Majestic and Moorish: Our Bone Curule Stool

The Roman Empire made several contributions to past and present society, one being chair design. As the Empire expanded across Europe, so did its methods of craftsmanship. It was during this reign that curule chairs were first introduced, said to have originated in Etruria. These chairs, or stools, were reserved for magistrates holding imperium to sit on during court or royal gatherings. One of the earliest recorded examples of the curule chair dates back to 494 BC when Roman dictator Manius Valerius Maximus was awarded one as a result of his victory over the Sabines.

Majestic and Moorish: Our Bone Curule Stool | Wisteria

In Rome, the curule chair was traditionally made of ivory and had a wide x-base, no arms, and no back. Keeping up with this regal tradition, we’ve created our Bone Curule Stool in the same fashion but updated it for a more modern appeal. Combining 18th-century Empire Style with 16th-century Moorish design, this exquisite stool has the best of both worlds. Each stool is embellished with hundreds of pieces of camel bone that are carved and inlaid into a wood frame by hand—a meticulous and time-consuming process skilled artisans endure to create these imperial pieces. Fit for a king or a queen, this stool is complete with a durable white linen cushion, and is an ideal seat for a vanity or desk. Hint: Pair two at the end of the bed for even more regal ambiance.

Majestic and Moorish: Our Bone Curule Stool | Wisteria

  
  
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The Man In Red (Or Blue): Our Nordic and Seaside Santas

Growing up many of us were told of the jolly old man with the big white beard and big belly that shook like a bowl full of jelly when he laughed. This man is Santa Claus—also known as Saint Nick, Father Christmas, Kris Kringle, or simply Santa—the man in red who shimmies down the chimney each Christmas Eve to deliver gifts to all the children who’ve been nice. Though this depiction has evolved into a fantastical character, the origins of Santa Claus actually stem from a 4th-century bishop named Saint Nicholas.

Saint Nicholas was a Greek Christian bishop of Myra, a province of the Byzantine Empire, now in Turkey. Saint Nicholas was extremely religious and devoted his entire life to Christianity. He became famous for his generosity—giving gifts to the poor—and is usually portrayed as a bearded bishop in canonical robes. In honor of his selfless actions, December 6 was known as Saint Nicholas’ Day. Children were bestowed gifts in his honor by their families the night before. This date later changed to December 24, following the course of the Reformation initiated by Martin Luther.

The story of Santa Claus varies slightly in each culture, taking on their own adaptation, but the heart of the story remains the same—emerging from a single Saint who gifted to the poor.

Our Nordic and Seaside Santas are a simple reminder of this special story.

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Our Nordic Santa is prepared for the winter season—bundled up and ready to go with a bushel of holly, a pinecone walking stick, and a lantern to light the way down those chimneys.

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Decked in hues taken from the sea, our Seaside Santa is a coastal-inspired take on the man in red. Toting a bounty of real shells, he’ll add a splash of maritime cheer to your holiday collection.

Featuring intricate details and lifelike qualities, each of our Santas are made completely by hand and will make a festive addition to your traditional or coastal-inspired spread.

 

  
  
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Unraveling the Story: Our Zardosi Wall Art

Zardosi is an intricate Persian embroidery technique that dates back to the Mughal Empire under the patronage Emperor Akbar. Traditionally done in gold bullion wire (Zardosi is a Persian word that means sewing with gold), this detailed needlework was once used by Persian royalty to embellish their garments and accessories. Due to industrialization and loss of royal patronage, this unique and extremely detailed technique is now practiced by only a handful of artisans—a dying art we’d like to keep alive.

Zardosi Method 

The Zardosi embroidery process begins with the artisan sitting (usually cross-legged) around the wooden framework with their tools. These tools include curved hooks, needles, gold or silver wire, and whatever style beads or sequins they choose. The design is then traced onto the fabric and stretched over a wooden frame—the intricate embroidery then begins.

Our Collection

Unraveling the Story: Our Zardosi Wall Art | Wisteria

Our Zardosi Isaiah Crown Wall Art  is fit for a king and will deliver a spiritual element to a wall space. Profiled in a gold wood frame, this ornate crown features delicate, hand-sewn beads and is outlined with the verse from Isaiah 28:5, “In that day the Lord Almighty will be a glorious crown, a beautiful wreath for the remnant of his people.”

Zardosi Cross Wall Art | Wisteria

Our Zardosi Cross Wall Art fits with holiday or everyday decor. Featuring an ornate crown atop a cross, this intricately detailed piece delivers the message from Isaiah 40:29–31, “He gives his power to the weak, and to those who have no might He increases strength . . .”

Zardosi Psalms Crown Wall Art | Wisteria

Last but not least, our Zardosi Psalms Crown Wall Art  features an ornate crown on a bed of laurel leaves above the verse from Psalms 149:4, “For the Lord takes delight in his people he crowns the humble victory.” This beautiful piece is embroidered on stretched canvas over a wood frame.

We can’t imagine how a wonderfully unique and traditional technique has become almost obsolete, and though it’s not much, we hope these pieces will help keep this dying art alive.

  
  
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Regal on the Rise: Our Rising Sunburst Mirror

History

As a decorative motif, the sunburst may have its roots in medieval religious roots, as it was used in churches as a symbol of God overlooking the members of the congregation. During the 17th century, the Catholic church began using elaborate montrances adorned with gilded rays. (See Wisteria’s interpretation coming this fall—our Sunburst Monstrances.) There is speculation that sunburst mirrors were around centuries before, as a convex mirror with a sunburst design was depicted in a 15th-century painting by Jan van Eyck.

Though sunburst mirrors may have been around for centuries before his reign, Louis XIV, also known as the Sun King, was the one who popularized the starburst motif. Many pieces of furniture owned by Louis XIV and architectural structures within his palace were adorned with this motif, especially the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles.

Rising Sunburst Mirror 

The Newsoms have a sunburst mirror Shannon’s mother found in the south of France hung above their fireplace. Inspired by its beauty and uniqueness, we recreated it to share with you. Traditionally made in a gold (and sometimes silver) hue, ours is hand-carved, layered whitewashed wood, adding a modern, rustic twist to a classic design.

Regal on the Rise: Our Rising Sunburst Mirror| Wisteria

The Newsom’s sunburst mirror

Bring a richness to any wall space with our Rising Sunburst Mirror !

Regal on the Rise: Our Rising Sunburst Mirror|Wisteria

 

 

 

  
  
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Frame by Frame: Creating a Salon Wall

So, you have that one empty (and consequently massive) wall that’s been staring at you far too long. Or maybe you have a collection of decor pieces, photos, and prints that you have yet to find the perfect place to hang in your home. Well, there’s a solution that may initially seem intimidating, but just might be what your polished home is missing. Enter the salon wall (AKA the gallery wall). A salon wall is a great way to infuse some personality into your space and really make a statement. You may not have all the right pieces laying around and find they may take some time. But don’t get overwhelmed—we have some tips and tricks to help you along the way.

Start by selecting a consistent color palette or theme. In our example, we’re highlighting all things avian in a range of natural hues. We suggest starting with a piece or two that you adore, then build your collection around that. Ultimately, your salon wall should reflect your personality and showcase your favorite things.

Once you’re happy with your collection, it’s time to play with the layout and put it all together.

First, anchor the collection. We think this is best done with one large piece. A dominant piece will serve as the foundation and dictate the flow of other smaller pieces. There is, however, an alternative if you don’t have this piece. In it’s place, use two to four pieces hung at matching heights to establish your focal point.

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We suggest starting from the center then working outward and upward. This will help maintain balance within your designated space.

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Vary the sizes and orientation of each piece. A variety of shapes and sizes will help the wall feel balanced and keep the eye entertained.

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Be sure to keep the distance between the pieces consistent. It doesn’t have to be exact but you don’t want it to look cluttered and completely unplanned. Also, take time to make sure each piece is level. Creating a salon wall is no easy feat, so details matter.

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Our favorite part of creating a salon wall is watching it all come together. It may seem like a daunting task at first, but trust us, you’ll love it. An added bonus is that you can break up the gallery at any time and rehang the pieces throughout your home (although we suggest you enjoy the finished product for awhile first)! Love our salon wall? You can purchase all pieces as a set or individually to suit your collection (at 20% off until 9/21)!

Frame by Frame: Creating a Salon Wall | Wisteria

All together now!

  
  
  • Chrissie Cheshire

    The products you have are amazing, interesting, decorative and fabulous. However, one sad point…….you do not ship to the UK.

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