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Unraveling the Story: Our Zardosi Wall Art

Zardosi is an intricate Persian embroidery technique that dates back to the Mughal Empire under the patronage Emperor Akbar. Traditionally done in gold bullion wire (Zardosi is a Persian word that means sewing with gold), this detailed needlework was once used by Persian royalty to embellish their garments and accessories. Due to industrialization and loss of royal patronage, this unique and extremely detailed technique is now practiced by only a handful of artisans—a dying art we’d like to keep alive.

Zardosi Method 

The Zardosi embroidery process begins with the artisan sitting (usually cross-legged) around the wooden framework with their tools. These tools include curved hooks, needles, gold or silver wire, and whatever style beads or sequins they choose. The design is then traced onto the fabric and stretched over a wooden frame—the intricate embroidery then begins.

Our Collection

Unraveling the Story: Our Zardosi Wall Art | Wisteria

Our Zardosi Isaiah Crown Wall Art  is fit for a king and will deliver a spiritual element to a wall space. Profiled in a gold wood frame, this ornate crown features delicate, hand-sewn beads and is outlined with the verse from Isaiah 28:5, “In that day the Lord Almighty will be a glorious crown, a beautiful wreath for the remnant of his people.”

Zardosi Cross Wall Art | Wisteria

Our Zardosi Cross Wall Art fits with holiday or everyday decor. Featuring an ornate crown atop a cross, this intricately detailed piece delivers the message from Isaiah 40:29–31, “He gives his power to the weak, and to those who have no might He increases strength . . .”

Zardosi Psalms Crown Wall Art | Wisteria

Last but not least, our Zardosi Psalms Crown Wall Art  features an ornate crown on a bed of laurel leaves above the verse from Psalms 149:4, “For the Lord takes delight in his people he crowns the humble victory.” This beautiful piece is embroidered on stretched canvas over a wood frame.

We can’t imagine how a wonderfully unique and traditional technique has become almost obsolete, and though it’s not much, we hope these pieces will help keep this dying art alive.

  
  

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